Ms. Miller, “Woke Bae”

Back to Article
Back to Article

Ms. Miller, “Woke Bae”


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Thursday, I had the opportunity to sit down with Ms. Miller, who teaches government, women’s studies, and AP European History here at Edison. During our interview, I was able to learn quite a bit about her, both in and out of the classroom.

Born in the Valley, Ms. Miller had a rough childhood; she grew up in poverty, and both of her parents struggled with substance abuse during her adolescence. She attended school in Clovis, where her financial situation was much more apparent to her peers. While she was reluctant to speak on her experiences during high school, she did share that she most enjoyed the friends she made and her multicultural literature course, which sparked her interest in history.

Despite a more negative relationship with school, it was the bond she formed with her teachers that drove her to become one herself. It was a career option she had considered since childhood, but the support she received from her teachers led to her consider it with a greater degree of sincerity. At age 27, Ms. Miller went to school to earn her teaching credentials, hoping that she would be able to make a difference in the lives of her students, just as her teachers had for her.

Over the years, she has taught at different schools, but Edison has been her favorite. She most loves being able to interact with students and staff from such a wide variety of backgrounds, and openly described it as “a great place to work”.

During her time here, some students have christened her as a “woke bae”; though she doesn’t necessarily agree (she views “woke” as constantly progressing, rather than a static state), her social justice work on campus is undeniable. Ms. Miller is the advisor for the Feminist Club, and advocated for the inclusion of a women’s studies course in the 2018-2019 class offerings. When asked why she has worked to make sure both have a presence on campus, she expressed that both are needed. She became the advisor for the Feminist Club so that girls could have a safe space to explore the issues that affect them both on- and off-campus. In regards to women’s studies, she believes it is vital to have a course in which groups that have been historically marginalized in standard curriculum are represented.

Towards the end of our conversation, I asked her if she would be willing to provide some advice to students who may be nervous to approach their teachers for support. In response, she suggested that students look for teachers and staff members with who they may have similarities. From there, she said, a student should reach out in whatever way they feel most comfortable, whether that be in-person or through an email. Ms. Miller specifically wanted to remind students that teachers and staff are here to help, and that she is always here to provide support.

At the end of our talk, it became apparent to me that the nickname “woke bae” was not nearly comprehensive enough. Not only could she be classified as “woke”, but she is incredibly friendly, approachable, and compassionate. Ms. Miller cares very deeply about the students here on campus, and it carries over into her actions both in and out of the classroom.